Nov 17, 2014 – This episode of the I’ve Been Falsely Accused Show Features Jarrett Adams (exoneree – wrongfully convicted – spent 10 yrs in prison for a crime he did not commit) and Norman Allen (wrongfully convicted – spent 25 yrs in prison for a crime he did not commit).

The “I’ve Been Falsely Accused” series started in May of 2012 on the Conversations With Cogee show (KLAV 1230AM – The Talk of Las Vegas) in hopes of raising awareness on wrongful convictions, to help exonerees with an open platform to speak, and to prevent more injustice from happening in the future. Following the show’s launch, Jeffrey Deskovic (founder of the Jeffrey Deskovic Foundation For Justice), who served 16 years for a crime he did not commit, joined on as a regular monthly news correspondent and is now co-hosting The I’ve Been Falsely Accused Show with Cogee.

LISTEN ONLINE www.KLAV1230AM.com

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Tune in this Monday, Sept 22nd 2PT/4CT/5ET, for an all new episode of the I’ve Been Falsely Accused Show! Featuring special guest Charles Belk who you may have heard of recently in the news. He is a film producer who was in Beverly Hills to attend a pre-Emmy party and was handcuffed and detained for about six hours before authorities investigating a nearby bank robbery realized they had the wrong man.

This episode is also a recap show featuring guests, exonerees from past shows, swinging back to give us an update on their lives in transition after being imprisoned for crimes they did not commit. You don’t want to miss this show!!
http://www.fittingthedescription.com/Backstory.html

Tune in Monday, Sept 22nd 2PT/4CT/5PT on KLAV 1230 AM – The Talk of Las Vegas!

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August 25, 2014 “I’ve Been Falsely Accused” Part 22. Featuring two extraordinary men – Johnny Pinchback and Charles Chatman – who both had served 27 years in a Texas prison for crimes they did not commit. They are now free (with the help of Innocence Project of Texas – www.ipoftexas.org), and are here on the I’ve Been Falsely Accused Show to share their stories.  Also in this episode is the director of the California Innocence Project – Mr. Justin Brooks!

Professor Justin Brooks has been the Director of California Innocence Project since its inception in 1999. Prior to co-founding CIP, Professor Brooks taught at Georgetown University School of Law and Thomas Cooley School of Law. At both institutions, his teachings focused on criminal law, criminal procedure, and corrections law.

Over the course of his career he has served as counsel on several high profile criminal cases and has been successful in exonerating many wrongfully convicted clients. He regularly appears in national news media programs and has been recognized several times by the Los Angeles Daily Journal as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in California. In 2010, California Lawyer Magazine awarded him the “Lawyer of the Year” award.

Professor Brooks has been very involved in training Latin American lawyers throughout his career. He founded the only trial skills academy in the country conducted in Spanish and he travels to Latin America training attorneys, judges, and law enforcement agents on trial skills and criminal forensics. He co-founded RedInocente, an organization devoted to starting and supporting innocence projects throughout Latin America. Professor Brooks has published extensively in the areas of criminal law, clinical education, and habeas litigation. He is the author of the only legal casebook devoted to the topic of wrongful convictions.

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July 21, 2014 – The I’ve Been Falsely Accused Show! Part 19  2PT/4CT/5ET  Listen live in Las Vegas on KLAV 1230 AM, or listen online worldwide www.KLAV1230AM.com and with the smartphone app ‘TuneIn.

Have any questions or comments you would like to ask our hosts, Cogee and Jeffrey or the guests? Call into the show  toll free at 1(866)820-5528.

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Tune in on May 19th! For an all new episode of Conversations With Cogee “I’ve Been Falsely Accused” Part 16!  2PT/5ET

Special Guests:
Laura Caldwell, Antoine Day, Obie Anthony, and Yusef Salaam

LAURA CALDWELL is a former civil trial attorney, now the Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. She is also director of Life After Innocence and a published author of 14 novels and one nonfiction book.

Before beginning her writing career, Laura was a partner in a Chicago law firm, specializing in medical malpractice defense and entertainment law. In 2001 she joined Loyola University Chicago School of Law and has taught Advanced Litigation Writing and International Criminal Law among others.

Laura began her writing career in women’s fiction and soon turned to mystery/thriller. While researching her sixth novel, The Rome Affair, Laura was led to the criminal case of 19-year-old Jovan Mosley, a good kid from one of Chicago’s very bad neighborhoods, who was coerced into confessing to a crime he didn’t commit. Charged with murder, he sat in a Cook County holding cell for nearly six years with no trial date. After hearing about his case, Laura joined a renowned criminal defense attorney to defend him, ultimately proving his innocence and inspiring her first nonfiction book, Long Way Home: A Young Man Lost in the System and the Two Women Who Found Him (Free Press, Simon & Schuster).

She is published in over 25 countries and her books have been translated into more than 13 languages. Laura is also a freelance magazine writer and has been published in Chicago Magazine, Woman’s Own, The Young Lawyer, Lake Magazine, Australia Woman’s Weekly, Shore Magazine and others.

Inspired by Mosley’s case and his challenges of rejoining society, Laura founded Loyola’s Life After Innocence clinic, which assists wrongfully convicted individuals and other innocent persons affected by the criminal justice system in order to help them re-enter society and reclaim their lives.

Caldwell is often booked as a keynote speaker nationwide captivating audiences by sharing her message of hope and encouragement to shorten the distance for people’s journeys home to their truth.

Caldwell, who lives in Chicago, continues to teach at Loyola Law School, write, direct the Life After Innocence program and enjoy the journey.

‌ANTOINE DAY was a budding musician when his life forever changed. On September 1, 1990, Thomas Peters and James Coleman were shot while shooting craps outside a liquor store on Chicago’s west side at about 1:30 a.mt. The men were taken to a hospital, where Peters died and Coleman was treated and released for a gunshot wound in the back. Day and a codefendant were arrested eight days later after Darrell Gurley, a nephew of Peters and witness to the crime, told police they were the shooters. Both were found guilty and sentenced to concurrent prison terms of 60 years for murder and 25 years for attempted murder.

In 2001 the Illinois Appellate Court granted Day a new trial based on ineffective assistance of counsel. Day’s trial court lawyer, Gay-Lloyd Lott, had failed to present numerous eyewitnesses and alibi witnesses who could have exonerated Day. Also, Lott had failed to effectively cross examine the surviving victim, Coleman, who had told prosecutors before the trial that Day was not involved. On May 8, 2002, the prosecution dropped all charges against Day. In September 2010, Judge Paul Biebel, Jr., presiding judge of the Criminal Division of the Circuit Court, granted Day a certificate of innocence.

While some exonerees stand in the limelight upon release, Day quietly picked up the pieces of his life. He initially took employment in the construction field, and today he is the Outreach Coordinator of Prison Reentry at the Howard Area Community Center Employment Resource Center. In this position, Day mentors at-risk teens and parolees, implements job training and placement programs, and runs neighborhood stabilization and anti-violence programs.

Antoine, along with Jarrett Adams (a fellow LAI exoneree), recently started the Life After Justice Center. The Center’s mission statement is: “To assist exonerees and parolees successfully reenter society. To provide clean, stable housing that acts as a transitional platform through a structured, mentored living environment. To facilitate job training, employment, counseling and other services through the use of outside providers. To connect with the local community and to be a positive contribution to improving the community’s image.” Currently the Center is raising funds and looking for a building in the near-West Chicago neighborhoods. The Center hopes to open its doors in the fall of 2012. For more information about the Center or to find out how you can help, please email the Center at: lifeafterjustice@gmail.com

OBIE ANTHONY III was convicted of murder and attempted robbery in 1995, despite the lack of physical evidence linking him to the crime. The prosecution relied on the testimony of John Jones, a convicted killer and pimp who ran a house of prostitution near the crime scene, to convict Mr. Anthony and his co-defendant Reggie Cole. Mr. Anthony was sentenced to life without the possibility of parole.

After receiving Mr. Anthony’s request for help in 2008, NCIP attorneys and students, along with Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent and Federal Public Defender Investigator Deborah Crawford, conducted an extensive re-investigation of the case. They discovered that John Jones had lied on the witness stand when he claimed he was not being rewarded for his testimony, when he denied firing a gun during the crime, and when he denied running a house of prostitution. In addition, prosecutors falsely denied that they had given Mr. Jones a deal for his cooperation and failed to correct his lies at trial. Mr. Jones admitted in 2009 that he never actually saw the perpetrators well enough to identify them. Mr. Anthony’s team also located surviving victim Luis Jimenez, who revealed that the actual perpetrators were 30 to 40 years old. Mr. Anthony was 19 at the time.
On September 30, 2011, after an 11-day evidentiary hearing earlier in the month, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Kelvin Filer vacated Mr. Anthony’s convictions based on several constitutional errors including prosecutorial misconduct, ineffective assistance of counsel and the false testimony of Mr. Jones. Mr. Anthony spent 17 years in prison before being released on October 4, 2011.

YUSEF SALAAM
The Central Park jogger case involved the assault and rape of a female jogger in New York City’s Central Park, on April 19, 1989. Five juvenile males—four black and one of Hispanic descent—were tried and convicted for the crime and served their sentences fully. The convictions were vacated in 2002 when Matias Reyes, a convicted rapist and murderer serving a life sentence for other crimes, confessed to committing the crime alone and DNA evidence confirmed his involvement in the rape. One of those five who were wrongfully convicted is here with us on today’s show – Yusef Salaam.

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Tune in on Monday, April 21, 2014 (2PT/5ET) to an ALL new episode of Conversations With Cogee “I’ve Been Falsely Accused” Part 14. Cogee and Jeffrey Deskovic raise awareness on wrongful convictions. Voices need to be heard, injustice needs to stop, and awareness needs to be given!

Cogee’s bringing back Lorenzo Johnson  and Tazza (Lorenzo Johnson’s wife) to continue the conversation about wrongful convictions.

Lorenzo “Cat” Johnson was freed after 16 years in prison when a federal appeals court ruled there was insufficient evidence to convict him. This is tantamount to an acquittal. Two years ago, he was released and had four and a half months with his family, got a job and spoke out for others wrongfully convicted. Then the U.S. Supreme Court ordered his conviction reinstated.

Lorenzo went back to prison with a sentence of life imprisonment without parole. Lorenzo has not stopped fighting for his freedom and vindication. This past year the federal courts have ruled against him twice, a signal to the prosecution and Pennsylvania courts that it is OK to keep an innocent man in prison for life! Go tohttp://www.freelorenzojohnson.org/ to sign the petition to free Lorenzo!

In 1998, when Jarrett Adams was 17 years old, he was falsely accused and wrongfully convicted of a sexual assault that he did not commit. He spent almost 8 years in prison before he was exonerated with the help of the Wisconsin Innocent Project.

Special guest Charles C. Miller has a 25 year track record of challenging assumptions of all sort such as feminine identity , political structures, religious structures to name a few.


Wrongfully convicted Nick Yarris faced the electric chair after being framed in 1982 for the rape and murder of a woman in his native Pennsylvania. He spent 8,057 days behind bars – much of it in solitary confinement – before DNA evidence finally cleared him and he was released in 2004. Mr Yarris makes a return visit to talk about his book about his life on death row called Seven Days To Live, his new life, new wife, film and call to action to end the death penalty in California. He says that “..survivors guilt is one of the hardest things that exonerees deal with – the people they left behind…”

Listen LIVE worldwide on www.ConversationsWithCogee.com Follow us on twitter @CogeeTalk, like us on Facebook.com/CogeeFans.

Do you know of anyone who has been falsely accused or wrongfully convicted? Contact us at www.ConversationsWithCogee.com or email us at ( IveBeenFalselyAccused at gmail dot com)

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Monday, April 14, 2014 (2PT/5ET) “I’ve Been Falsely Accused” Part 13.  Featured guests: Julie Christine-Lael Baumer, Kian Khatibi, and Tazza Johnson (Lorenzo Johnson’s wife).  Cogee and Jeffrey Deskovic raise awareness on wrongful convictions. Voices need to be heard, injustice needs to stop, and awareness needs to be given!

Listen LIVE worldwide on www.ConversationsWithCogee.com Follow us on twitter @CogeeTalk, like us on Facebook.com/CogeeFans.

Julie Christine-Lael Baumer was falsely accused and convicted of child abuse (SBS) in 2005, and sentenced to 15 years in prison.
In 2009 her conviction was overturned and after a successful second trial was exonerated in 2010.
While incarcerated Ms. Baumer wrote several novels, and after countless failed attempts to gain meaningful employment, decided to publish “An undeserved sentence”, a fictitious mystery and suspense novel, unrelated to her case. www.amazon/Undeserved-Sentence…/1466285192. In the same year, Ms. Baumer opened a screen printing and embroidery business, www.lilharryscloset.com.
Today Ms. Baumer is pursuing a degree in Criminal Justice through St. Leo University and promotes awareness on wrongful convictions and the need for compensation for those wrongfully convicted.

Kian Khatibi was released in 2008 after serving nine years for a stabbing he eventually discovered that his brother had committed. Beyond the travail of coping with this filial betrayal, he was freed from prison with only the pocket cash he had when arrested and without identification, which left him initially unable to apply for a credit card, a bank account or assistance from the welfare office.
Kian strives not to be bitter – focusing intensely on making something out of his life – and he remains determined to give back to the community that helped him move on. Khatibi transferred from Westchester Community College to NYU’s Steinhardt School of Education and completed his undergraduate degree as a media, culture and communications major.
Now in his third year at law school, Kian wants to be a civil rights or public service attorney.
“You can never get back the time you lose, but I’ve tried to work harder so I can make the best out of a bad situation,” he said. “I can’t say where I’d be if this didn’t happen, but I’m going to keep going forward.”

Lorenzo “Cat” Johnson was freed after 16 years in prison when a federal appeals court ruled there was insufficient evidence to convict him. This is tantamount to an acquittal. Two years ago, he was released and had four and a half months with his family, got a job and spoke out for others wrongfully convicted. Then the U.S. Supreme Court ordered his conviction reinstated.
Lorenzo went back to prison with a sentence of life imprisonment without parole. Lorenzo has not stopped fighting for his freedom and vindication. This past year the federal courts have ruled against him twice, a signal to the prosecution and Pennsylvania courts that it is OK to keep an innocent man in prison for life! Go to http://www.freelorenzojohnson.org/ to sign the petition to free Lorenzo!

Do you know of anyone who has been falsely accused or wrongfully convicted? Contact us at www.ConversationsWithCogee.com or email us at ( IveBeenFalselyAccused at gmail dot com)

 

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